Building my dream computer - Part 1

Pubblicato il 19 feb 2019
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Commenti

  • If you needed, you can run VGA through an OSSC and then HDMI out.

  • I Read your Page and eventuly came to this Video , Great Content , I agree . Liked and Shared :) QC

  • I share your dream David. I just downloaded the emulator for Linux - no messing - it just worked and it's awesome. Having a play right now. I'll probably end up buying one of these while I wait for my Spectrum Next to arrive.....which you'll no doubt beat to market :) I've hovered over buying a color maximite since your video on it.....again...might pick one of those up too while I wait.....

  • Part 2 is here: it-tvs.com/tv/video-sg-6Cjzzg8s.html

  • One thing I really miss about 8 bit computers is being able to boot them up in about a second and the ability to shut them off at any time, without having to go through a shut-down sequence. And, yeah, I agree with LGR that the restrictiveness of the capabilities REQUIRES the programmers to be that much more clever, which lends itself to making a pretty good game, great. For example, the Atari 2600 is EXTREMELY limited in many respects (only 128 bytes, yes BYTES, of RAM and no video buffer, etc), but what programmers have been able to do with the machine has surprised even the people who designed the hardware. Since almost all of the control is put in the hands of the programmer, including actually drawing the screen, a restriction became an advantage and the platform lasted far longer than was expected. [Check out "Stella at 20" for an awesome documentary on the 2600.]

    • @mrDesman Watching the documentary "Stella at 20" the old 2600 programmers talk about spending days or even weeks trying to reduce the size of their code by only a handful of bytes so that it could fit in the allotted ROM size, or spending a huge amount of time thinking of every kind of trick they could to get their code to execute in _EXACT_ number of cycles they needed so that on-screen graphics drew correctly (on the 2600, the programmer is virtually in complete control of the video - by necessity!). There's a story that David Crane tells about how he squeezed 256 _Pitfall!_ screens into only a 4k cart (I think, maybe smaller) using a mathematical algorithm (a polynomial counter) that could be reversed if needed to get the layout of the previous screen. Here he is talking about this at a lecture: it-tvs.com/tv/video-MBT1OK6VAIU.html&t=22m44s

    • Totally agree with the restrictiveness idea. For me, the beginning of the end was around 1992 or 1993 when they happily reported that new Turbo Pascal 7.0 will be able to produce .EXE files more than 1 megabyte in size! "Wow! There goes optimization...", I thought. Actually, playing with Arduinos reminded me of the days when you'd be squeezing every last byte out of your hardware. Makes you really treasure those 2k of RAM - and some STM32 Cortex M0 with it's 20k of RAM feels like a palace afterward. Now if I could get my paws on some real i386 with VGA card... 256 colours and video memory that can be accessed as an array - that, my friends, was a dream made a reality...

    • @JustWasted3HoursHere Yes, I know :) But that's a super computer, in a way. I actually find it rather pathetic (yes, hard word) that M$ couldn't get a decent behaviour out of a normal PC for 35 years. I would really prefer an OS in EPROM (NOR-Flash), just like in the home computers, or todays mobile phones, appliances and embedded systems. That would (or could) be both lightning fast and secure.

    • @Herr Friberger When I updated my Windows machine to an SSD for the main drive, it changed the entire experience of using the computer. It's not quite C64 boot speed, but it certainly is WAY faster than it was before. There actually are solid state drives that use actual DDR memory and they are STUPID fast. Like, boot your computer in about 3 or 4 seconds. But they are also expensive and require constant power to retain their contents, unlike a typical SSD which can hold its contents without power. By the way, SSD prices have dropped substantially in the last year or so. If you don't have one, I *HIGHLY* recommend it! Not just boot up speed is improved, but the entire experience is.

    • Agreed. The first time i "booted" Windows (in 1991, on a 25 MHz 486), I was literally chocked by how slow the process was. It took around a minute! I still cannot figure out why it must take more than a fraction of a second, just like a calculator, or a 1970/80s "home computer". (Have made my living by designing electronics and writing (high and low level) software for almost 40 years now.)

  • 6:16 «The user guide.. that was the size of a book. And the user guide would teach you everything there was to know about the machine» Well, man saying that has a Commodore 64 User's Guide on his hands, but that doesn't agree with his words. Commodore 65 User's Guide with its about 176 pages doesn't cover all topics. You NEED Commodore 64 Programmer's Reference Guide, with its about 514 pages, to cover all aspects like in deep BASIC programming, machine language, and graphics and sound in more detail. You got a book with Commodore 64, User's Guide, but you need the big one, Commodore 64 Programmer's Reference Guide, this is the Commodore 64 Bibble.

  • So cool.

  • "so i made a fb group" ...Dad?

  • You know what I always found difficult about programming in Java, having to open up a window to type my code. Fucking hell man hehehe.

  • Actually not a big fan of Commode dore systems. Cheaply built

  • Why aren't you using virtualisation? You can use a modern machine with that and it will allow you to install any ancient Windows version.

  • Hey are you using an 8 bit computer to make this video?

  • 5:51 And now you're demonetized

  • Make it with amstrad basic!

  • 8bit guy: Modern computers (shows a photo of a decade old Mac)

    • The changes in electronics technology are slower now. So it's not only in a chronological sense that a decade old Mac is *much* closer to (fully) modern PCs than it is to the C64 of 1982 (which is actually using a CPU designed in 1975).

  • this would be great for testing C64 disk drives. I sold all my C64 stuff except for 2 disk drives I forgot about. I want to sell them but can't test them out.

  • loading Sublogic FS1 on a TRS-80 was always fun. The volume had to be set just right or it wouldn't load.

  • Mlli kanet la chaine

  • Is your computer an example where the software has outpaced the hardware ? Because that has never happened in history. My advice for Cloanto is dress up in a business suit and visit them in person. Catch a plane if need be. It always works for me !

  • Why use a PS/2 keyboad instead of USB one? Wouldn't that be more user friendly?

  • But why Commodore Basic, it was so unfriendly compared to Acorn, Spectrum or MSX. I guess its an American thing.

    • @JustWasted3HoursHere Thanks, and same.

    • @Herr Friberger Nice talking to ya.

    • @JustWasted3HoursHere Well, it was the _syntax_ I was talking about here, though :) Java has the same &&, | |, == as C/C++ (sadly also JS, php, perl, etc. and 70-80% of newer languages). Java also lacks many features of C++, for both good and bad, as you know. But you could criticise C/C++ for its semantics as well, such as it's infamous non existent index control (which has lead to thousands of bugs and vulnerabilities), or its lack of nested functions, no garbage collection, or primitive low level character in general, which does not fit an OO-language very well. (The = instead of := and == instead of = was actually one of the reasons I left the industry - changed my career. I do programming only as a hobby now, and mostly in my own language, using my own compiler.)

    • @Herr Friberger Yeah, not a big fan of C/C++ myself. I much prefer the relaxed rules of Java, with the power of C. There was a BASIC-like language I used to play around with years ago called "BlitzMax" which ran on Windows, MacOSX and Linux that I believe is now free (but not updated anymore: The programmer has a new development environment called "Monkey". Not sure if either one is being actively developed anymore. [ Just looked. Several past Blitz products are now free to download, but have not been updated in at least 5 years: www.blitzcoder.org/forum/downloads.php ]

    • @JustWasted3HoursHere Sure! I mostly use my own language, but certainly prefer BASIC over the C-syntax that has taken over young peoples minds. I simply can't stand those silly &&, | |, ==, ===, etc. But speaking of good BASICs (and non mandatory line numbers), I could say that one of the nicest I've seen was HP-BASIC of the early 1980s, very elegant, while the most efficient interpretators I've seen were the ABC 80 and 800 BASICs (Scandinavian Z80 based computers from 1978-86). These were actually faster than the famously quick BBC micro, which meant that you could write fully playable arcade games in interpreted BASIC (and people did).

  • I taught myself on An Apple 2C they had in a corner of a class room. It was there for kids to play games on back in 1990. I used my lunch break and sat down every night with the manual and a floppy disc that walked you through how a computer worked and how to write code. I miss spending hours typing code just to make the screen turn colors , display my name, and flip it over each time I pushed enter. Everyone wondered what was wrong with me. lol. We got our first real computer at home in 1995. We got a Packard Bell 2440. We were part of the lawsuit that was made against them for selling new computers with used parts in them. I think the amount equaled $4 by the time lawyers all got their piece of the pie. It wasnt worth the effort. Years later, I built my own computer but had a friend set it up as I can build anything, I just couldn't set it up. Programming was fun and I learned a lot of the basics. I just got into other things that require more muscle. I learned small engine repair and that makes me more excited.

  • I like floppy disks and floppy drives though be nice if it was possible to make floppy drives that will load fast and make floppy disks that can hold a lot like a SD card can.

  • 45-60 orders daily ... Not too shabby. How does the post office think about that ?

  • I purchased a twin 5.25 in floppy drive box for my BBC B back in the day. What a revolution compared to tapes! Program on the A drive and data on the B drive. Great stuff! Still works. Btw your initiative reminds me of Linus Torvalds' first days of his Linux OS.

  • No, the Raspberry Pi is *NOT* just a Linux machine. The Raspberry Pi *can* run Linux.

    • especially for someone who can write his/her own kernel

  • These clowns would have zero cons about 8bit pc 30 years ago

  • "Beautiful Blue Screen"... and you know that despite you're 25 and fairly interested about retro gaming you're definitely too young to fully enjoy 8-bit computers xD Still, a really nice video :D

  • Well, since you didn't ask me, I'll share anyway... What I missed about the Commodore 64 was the excitement of new things. Amazing things that were never done before. From games to office productivity. Everything - from the beginnings of email to BBS's to cool games. Everything and everyone was on a race to the next great idea and there was no shortage of them either. We simply don't have much of that anymore. Sure, graphics are better - sure, sound too - but in the end, most of everything we have today is just an improved version of these 80's developments.

  • I might have been interested in possibly getting involved but I don't do Facebook and have no interest in getting a Facebook account. I am currently working on my own 8-bit computer board based on a 6809 with plans to have versions that will use the 65C816 and 6800.

  • I was _not_ expecting the rush of warm fuzzies that I experienced at 12:10. Those are some powerfully positive memories.

  • How I love a guy saying the best thing is: 'There's no updates, no waiting yada yada yada' Then one of the bad things are: 'It sucked at productivity - Having to configure drivers for the printer yada yada' - Please make up your mind :) Do you want a new computer with all the bells and whistle, or do you honestly *really* like the 'crappy' computers of yesterday? :)

  • My perfect 8 bit machine: First, I will need a 16bit CPU. Erm.

  • When you listed "modern parts" and "VGA or HDMI video", I immediately though "Propeller 2". But then you don't want micro-controllers and want it to be 6502 based. I wonder how you'll be doing the video part. I'm eager to see this series to the final second of the final video. I 'think it will be a great series, and by the way, nice video and thanks for sharing!

  • 5:52 r/accidentalswastika

  • Wow Vic 20 was my first computer too , and I also typed in the exact same programs from the manual....memories

    • The Restart Point my first computer was a first generation Intel Celeron, the one you plugged into the motherboard like a NES cartridge.

  • Dang! So many orders for Planet X3, awesome! :DDDDDDD

  • For sure its an impressive goal! Still...sounds difficult to get there.

  • LGR is the wrong guy to ask about 8bit computers. He's said a few times they aren't his cup o' tea and never had one growing up.

  • Omg LGR???? Really????? I love

  • This isn't what a dream computer looks like.

  • 7:24 finally a reason that doesn't sound like my Linux machine (I will occasionally write assembly on it even) 8:37 and were back to Linux... 11:27 He's calling me out... 500 GB hard drive I have mine boot into the terminal...

  • Any recent progress?

  • will there be part two?

  • BTW screw facebook seriously the people interested in this project hate facebook and mark cyborg zuckface as well as google. Discord is a better IDEA or what about Whirlpool Forums?? OR what about the EEVblog I am sure David Jones will accommodate this project cos he is into all this computer engineering stuff.

  • Fantastic idea, can it hook up to the internet with an ethernet port and dial IP addressed BBSes??? Cos I want a system that does not involve google and can never allow access to them.

  • can it run crysis

  • The most important thing is the soft compatibility (exept some rear special cases).

  • Why don't you take a modern high speed computer like the Raspberry Pi and write a completely custom version of Commodore Basic 2.0 that operates the exact same as the C64, allowing people to write much larger and more complex programs while still keeping the capability to write directly in ASM(albeit ARM, not 6502). No Linux, no emulator, just C64 Basic running on the processor directly

  • Why would you want to use ps/2? It’s so antiquated!

  • My dream computer: Intel Core I7 and other good stuff David: I'm just gonna casually make my own kernel.

  • Why not just use an FPGA for everything except the video, like Jeri Ellsworth did back in 2005 with the DTV?

  • David do you know the ZX Spectrum Next? www.specnext.com/about/

  • Part 2?

  • It's been six months sense this video was uploaded. Any updates? Not everyone is willing to have a facespy.. I mean spybook... I mean facebook account.

  • Does TheC64 fit these requirements?

  • it-tvs.com/ch/UCDNOdUCq1Qmn8IrINAIHwZg

  • part 2?

  • *A request* (TL;DR version): Can the Facebook group feed be aggregated into an RSS feed? Long version: Unsure if aggregation "bots" to present Facebook group content into something more widely accessible such as RSS is technically possible (the company has - understandably - been cracking down on third party apps, and it's probable they don't provide a native option since it directly means fewer sign-ups). To be clear, I don't intend to advocate a different discussion platform (there has been much animosity over what the alternative could be), rather if there are tools available to expand access to the conversation (I am unlikely to weigh in on something, rather curious as to what is discussed) in a "set up and forget" manner - like what TwitRSS.me is to Twitter - it would be a more inclusive way for someone to be more informed on the progress.

  • Almost 1mil subs!!!