Building my dream computer - Part 1

Pubblicato il 19 feb 2019
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  • me having a gaming pc from 2019 that can run on max graphics like resident evil 2 remake with 70 fps my dream computer: Apple ii+ from 1977

  • Actually... a 4 pot inline with a big battery slapped on the back is way easier to explain than a old-school carbureted V8. IMHO

  • At school we have a learning programming language for a robot in a virtual world without variables except the world itself and I really liked that restriction too

  • Hey 8-Bit I think you should map your commodore's memory functionally to take full advantage of the extra memory. Map the base memory that the c64 is expecting to have to the lower half of the ram, but extend your kernel so that if you x-copy a bunch of registers from the lower ram to the higher ram (like say an image) the information will be paged across in the modern method. ie - update the virtual 'page' -

  • Thanks for the video. Check out temple os!

  • This is the first video I saw of you!

  • Honestly, the first 8-bit systems were, in my humble opinion, never really intended to be used for any serious productivity tasks and were more geared toward an edutainment device, not much different than many of the 'board games' that came before them. It wasn't until quite a few years into the whole technological movement did they start being utilized for streamlining business and productivity tasks in the form of data acquisition, manipulation and control as well as innovations in communication. Those corporations and obscure university departments on the leading edge of those advancements really drove the tech and helped build the foundation for what we have now. There really isn't much that I miss about the days of the pre - "autoexec.bat" and "Config.sys" DOS days. So, as a result these old systems have really come full circle because they were nothing more than novelties back then as they are now and that's as it should be. Time moves forward (i.e. - When was the last time you saw a coal fired, steam powered locomotive?) Get the point?

  • 17:15 -ASCII Charater

  • It brings a lot of memory and carage for me to change the way thinking of computers.Also it fires up new era for me.

  • I would want to go even more modern and have something modern x86 (or even ARM) based. It could have clock frequencies for CPU and GPU synced, or divided, like the CPU at 3 GHz and the GPU at 1.5 GHz (or even just 2 and 1 Ghz, or maybe just 1 GHz for everything). The out-of-order instruction.... I guess I'll call it a decoder/sorter, could be absent. The memory stack separation for security could be absent for transparent memory access. Instead of PCIe, it could have extremely fast GPIO, maybe just the equivalent of 4 PCIe lanes worth of GPIO. The kind of thing that if somebody bothered to code for, could shtt all over even the next gen consoles, because assembly language code that has to be coded in order or it just doesn't work, or doesn't work well enough to even be passable as a game (or whatever program it is). With enough demand it would be as simple as a custom APU from AMD, just like Sony and Microsoft do for their consoles. the removed features should help keep price lower. The big thing this would do, is allow learning code that could be easily used on modern desktops, and would run well because you have to code things in proper order, instead of half-assing and recommending higher spec hardware.

    • I have no coding experience by the way.

  • I love that you all know each other..

  • Случайно наткнулся на это видео. Давно увлечён темой создания современного ZX Spectrum и всегда останавливало только непонимание, как формировать видеосигнал.

  • The Acorn Atom was a beautiful computer to use, in its day. The ability to code assembly language into BAsic programs, which could have offsets and macros, so the code could be saved to tape , and then reloaded into the required locations. Or the code could be compiled in site and then called. And the indirection operators ? ! for byte and 16 bit word access to memory directly. And of course the expansion bus was compatible with the mprevious System 3 And it was the foundation for what would have been the Proton, but in fact later became the BBC MICRO , *sigh*

  • Guess they call us boomers now

  • My dream computer is a Simple computer that wont lag trying to load a Game

  • Now that the X16 is looking to be more expensive than David originally desired, the C256 Foenix looks pretty good. The Mega65 has progressed in a pleasing way, too! Nothing wrong with that, though, back in the day there were a bunch of competing 8-bit machines, too...

  • And why not a virtual machine? (¿Y por qué no una máquina virtual?)

  • Its called nostalgia people, it was so awesome when we were younger. But i have no need for them. Computers these days are far more fun and better aswell.

  • My question is this: why not get a modern computer loaded with Dos and start from there.

  • Can't wait to see where you guys go with this David! I'll be ordering one for sure.

  • i miss things, like being in awe of my good friend, and absolute genius, Sean Rolnick, & his dad. His dad was a systems engineer for OTB in NJ,(Off Track Betting), & would bring home hoards of computer parts, like 12 inch, monochrome monitors with no plastic cases, like 22 of them! his garage was filled with all kinds of things i dreamed of playing with, while sitting in my 4th grade class. we would come home from school, and Sean and i would break out the graph paper, and code our own game, like a frogger like, car game for example, in an afternoon, on his c64 & 1541. one day, sean and i were pulling apart a betamax vcr we found in the trash, to increase our parts bin for our robot we were building,(i shit you not...we were 8 year olds!), and his dad calls us inside to check out his pc. He had built, a complete PC, metal frame holding one of those 12 inch monitors, underneath was a spaghetti mess of wires and chips on a wirewrapped homemade board, complete with a beautiful, real key, microswitch black keyboard, and let us code, some small assembly language( no basic) on it, to try it out. i was absolutely blown away by this. to this day, i dreamed of re-creating that computer he built. for me, it is this, that what was so special, about these amazing, antique machines. the creativity....the memories.....the wonderment.......i can't even find a trace of this in today's windows 10 machines. This, to me, is retro. This is why i find your channel so great. for this, i thank you.....and the other retro channels as well. :) thanks guys :)

  • i don't want emulation. when i call a register, i want to know i'm accessing that register. i do not want a dumbed down, extra on - the - side, but not used shit, or have to go through that software to get to an artificial heart of a virtual machine. i want to have access to all the harware, and know it's full usability, and it's limitations, with no extras. having 100mhz, and only using 1mhz, just seems like having 2 engines in your car, and hiding one engine, and not starting it, only running the other one, dragging the weight of the added engine, for no reason. if my car has two engines, i want the added power of both. most of my computer childhood was aimed towards IMPROVING my coco + coco 2, (never modded my vic 20) & was most of the fun, to modify hardware, to make my platform faster, more powerful, (piggybacked 256chips) & run devices like my armatron out of my RS-232C. I guess it's the useless, extra power that bothers me the most about emulating devices. i wanted to max out the hardware's capability, and know it, inside and out. you just can't get that wonderfully limitating hardware fun, from a dumbed down powerhouse. i can't understand why anyone would want to. so, i guess i'm saying, there's no subsitute for the actual hardware, when it comes to retro. i'm currently debating scratch building a pc, with a Z80L cpu, or finding what i used to have.sorry for the rant. i hope someone can understand my point i'm trying to get across........ TY 8 bit guy for awesome channel. i can't believe people just give you things, like that trs-80 model 1. i'm jealous...... : )

  • Well mate. If I would go back to 8 bit chips it would be the modern version of the Z80 chip running CP/M from SSD cards. Back in the day I wasn't into graphical programming but more business style programming. Cobol, Fortran and Assembler. I did use Pascal as the main language but like I said; business style programming; green screen. Mostly I coded things like inventory control, accounting, BBS, remote device controllers (lights, weather sensors, really what's called IoT now) and etc. Wrote my first OS at 27 which was a PC version of VMS. Lost it sadly due to hard crash and all of the backups were bad when I was about to move it to a window environment on the then i386. But it far out performed MS-DOS 4.x by six fold. Mostly because I didn't use that rubbish C but assembler. I really wished I did get it into Windows but I was having issues with graphic card drivers and no one wanted to release the API calls to that card so I could write a driver for that OS. If I did go back to work on 8 bit it would have been the design I came up with back in the early 80's where it was around 16 Z80's running my version of MP/M which really was MultiProcessor Monitor Control Program as the OS. But looking at what you were interested in; no I never cared for 6505 chips. Really didn't like the Intel line but after a while I was struck with it and the segmentation memory stupidity. Would have been better with linear memory addressing. Now, Amiga I did look at but there just wasn't enough coding tools for it to make it worth wild as I thought of it for my VMS OS. Expandability issues and so on. By that time I did look at it ethernet was becoming more affordable. So, I could have always created servers to perform x process using the Amiga as the front end controller.

  • this reminds me of the time my cat joined the Illuminati and faked the moon landing for the Chinese, he got a big check in the mail and blew it all on strippers now he works at Wal-Mart stocking the shelves

  • this reminds me of the time my cat joined the Illuminati and faked the moon landing for the Chinese, he got a big check in the mail and blew it all on strippers now he works at Wal-Mart stocking the shelves

  • I miss the 8-bit sounds and music and simple game-play.

  • Es hermoso me encanta, muy bueno, perdón que no escriba en ingles soy muy malo en ese idioma. Me encanta.

  • I dont see the point of this computer. Just use an C64 emulator. Why waist money and time on something like this.

  • why not FPGA? Simply because you don't know how to program it. the untold shameful answer Infact, why don't use a RaspenberryPI? the "told" answer is that coding it isn't different than coding for a desktop computer sounds like a lamer's choice

  • not saying it is not fun to do this; but fundamentally it is a niche of a niche market. If this is done for money; the sales would not even cover the costs of the investment in time and efforts; especially because this project rely on the free time of people, and after a while, people get bored or lose interest in side projects. Hiring someone with background to do the whole design or part of it, would probably speed up things but then it won't be a "free side project" anymore; and as someone who invested a ton of money in free side projects, I can say that the bill does grow quite fast when doing these things. If it is done for fun and given away for free, as one off thing, maybe it could be an interesting project for few months, but beyond that, not sure if there may be critical mass to even get enough people with the right skill set to get this idea to become reality. Kickstarter would be a nice thing to try; mainly to hire people and pay them, to design this whole thing. But then you realize that if you really want something fun to program, there are plenty of ARM cpu that are already set with a standard kernel for IO; and those are a lot of fun to program both in C, with the Arduino IDE or python or even C++ or assembly, with Atmel studio and similar IDE. Not sure what is so enticing in getting an 8 bit modernized, but to each their own. I honestly found more fun the project from "Ben Eater", that did build his own CPU and wrote the instructions for it, starting from scratch. That teach you really well how a computer works, and it is doable with just wires, transistors and few IC (and a lot of patience). it-tvs.com/tv/video-HyznrdDSSGM.html Hope you will get to the point where you want to get, and have fun during the journey; in the end, that's what matter after all.

  • STM32f746 loaded with BASIC(folks over in Germany) wire in a sound chip to the open bus,a serial printer on the rx/tx,or a sim5320A and you have a cell phone too.

  • If it was slow, you should’ve just downloaded some ram

  • すごいな……英語聞き取れないけど、字幕見たらなんとなくすごいことがわかる。

  • If you want the ultimate in flexibility AND compatibility, FPGA may be the way to go.

  • don't they have commodore emulators?

    • Yes, hundreds of them, for virtually every device with a processor. He seems to enjoy reinventing the wheel for some reason.

  • Why not write a kernel for the Raspberry Pi that does just BASIC and assembly (instead of booting into Linux)? Is your development board and video board much cheaper? Maybe one of your requirements is compatibility with 6502 machine language? Economies of scale make the RPi very cheap. I'm sure you know the RPi model A costs $35. Don't mean to dampen your enthusiasm; I was just curious.

  • Oof, that Facebook group idea might need rethinking.

  • What I miss about 8-bit computers: I miss feeling in control of my computer. Maybe it was slow. Maybe it was limited. But it was mine and it didn't do anything(literally nothing) that I didn't tell it to do. I miss the immediacy of the computer following my instructions(How many times have you double clicked on something which didn't respond immediately despite your computer being thousands of times faster than an 8-bit computer). I miss being able to understand what my computer is doing and why(I don't even know how many millions of lines of other people's code is running on my computer nor do have enough time in my life to read all of them even if they were available). I miss being able to run programs without internet access. I miss software being designed specifically for my computer instead of being forced to buy the computer that the software vendor asks for. I miss being independent of huge corporations sending me updates that do God only knows what or why. I miss my computer not getting slower as it ages(How many times has someone told you to buy a new computer because yours is running slower than it did when you bought it). I miss being able to write and run my code without needing multiple devices(development board, cable, software tool chain, and computer used for code editing) which all have to be compatible with each other. I'm the kind of guy who leaves specific wrenches and screwdrivers in places where I'm going to need them so that I don't have to go looking for them later and it irritates me when I have to scrounge together a development environment to alter the behavior of a "brick" which I haven't touched in 3 years. I miss being forced to get creative while adapting my task to a set of known constraints as opposed to the modern paradigm where you just write a logically sound(but perhaps inefficient) program and throw resources at it until it works acceptably. What I don't miss about 8-bit computers: Low capacity floppy disks and the difficulty of moving data from one computer to another.

  • 128 commandor that can be connected to a modern-monitor and with usb-port,sd-card, 512 kb memmory ,referencemanual for the computer including information so one can program assembler would be great

  • I'll take the 57

  • He used Nano to edit files in this video, now I wanna see him use Vim.

  • Where can we find the source code for you kernel?

  • Isn’t LGR a bit too young to remember the 8 bit era??

  • Any update to this?

  • USE YOUR TOOLS.... SERIAL PORT. BI-DIRECTIONAL PARALLEL PORT Weren't some late VGA CRT bi-directional comms via light pens ??

  • LOL ....POKE & PEEK ... I am giggling like a child now !! Where's my light pen ? Hold my beer !!

  • Oh John ward.. I think you have more then retro bright to worry about.. Worry about MORTIS.

  • It sounds like a contradiction, but it's the restrictiveness of those old systems - their limitations - that really made them great, because it forced the programmers to really spend a lot of time making the actual gameplay fun and interesting and to get the most out of the hardware. The Atari 2600 is a huge challenge to program and requires the software to do almost all of the work (no video buffer to speak of and only 128 bytes of RAM, etc) but that limitations allowed it to last far longer than it otherwise would have because programmers figured out how to make it do thngs that the hardware guys never even dreamed of. Anyway, I hope this project gets competed. We need something like this. First Person Shooters are starting to get old...

  • Guy at 7:12 = Educated Bubbles

  • One option is to develop on the emulator. I write my PET demos on a laptop with a cross compiler, do the initial testing on the emulator and after that transfer them to the real deal with an adapter. Mostly because there aren’t good macro assemblers for PET but also because it makes me able to use version control and develop simultaneously with my friend.

  • Seeing the Amiga 500 still gives me goosebumps.

  • I wish I lived when 8-bit computing is "mainstream" and you could manually adjust registers on the fly. These systems made you understand what was happening and it was simple enough to learn through playing with it. I wish this because I would have a greater understanding of why things evolved to what they are today and a greater appreciation for the modern hardware that seems so abstracted away from me in the modern Windows PC and even in the Linux world to a point.

  • hey @8-Bit Guy, Ive got my hands on a set of dozens of old connectors. all old cellphone connectors from back when every phone had a different charger on one end and either usb or rj45 on the other end. the first person i thought of was you. want them? ill mail them to you, free.

    • @David Spencer give those away then...

    • @Squier Strat one man's trash is another man's treasure. Ive got 6 flat screen TVs in my home and picked up everyone of them from the side of the road, and spent less than $30 each on repairs.

    • Just toss it. Nobody needs that junk

  • So a TI graphing calculator...

  • This is dumb. All this hype around a stupid shell interface for the commodore 64. Id rather donate to the nintendo 65.

  • This sounds like an excellent computer that I will definitely purchase in its fruition.

  • 10:18 LGR is looking like a chameleon trying to match the colours of his surroundings. 🤓

  • I guess my suggestion would be an RPi that boots directly into an emulator. Would give you all of the experience with a volume machine for low cost and simplicity.

  • Thank you so much for starting this project!

  • Very nice projects, thanks for sharing! Will be interesting to follow. Isn't the reason 1Mhz computers only have tile based (paletted) graphics because full-screen just demands a fillrate that can't be handled in 25 fps on such a machine? I would say that it would be hard/impossible? to use a 1 Mhz machine and have decent framerates of full-screen, high-res 3d/non-tile-based graphics on that machine. Only way would be to have a full DSP/GPU that would do all the work. But wouldn't that kind of defeat the retro-feeling of it? I did a similar thing with a friend, but all things are Custom in our machine. Using FPGA, our own CPU 16-bit 25Mhz, mix between 68K and 6502 instruction set, own tile-based graphics with lots of sprites and several tile layers, even additative/subtractive blending and such. Semi Bitmap-mode either by using 1 4-bit paletted mega sprite that covers the screen, or, if full 16-bit image is wanted, 3 mega-sprites (R,G,B) overlayed with additative blendning. Tools is 1 assembler in JAVA, 2 emulators (JAVA and C#), start of a C compiler in C#. Examples is small demo game, 3d engine, small fractal and some others... my friend actually wrote an OS that looked like C64 starting screen, which could both load prgroams from SD and execute them. Ahh I would really like to revisit that again and continue.